Sunday, February 26, 2012

My Little Sister Can Make Art Too!

My sister Emily recently showed off her artistic skills on Facebook and I decided I had to share it here. She's only in Middle school, but has been impressing me all the time with what she can do. Isn't this just the coolest?

No nail polish pen, folks. This is the real deal. She only used nail polish and a dotting tool.

I am a Shameless Sellout

I decided to use my upcoming painting show as a chance to sell these little guys. They have nothing to do with the work I am displaying, but I love them and they sold well the last time I put them in a show, so I see no harm in having a little box of them somewhere during the opening. As you can see, they aren't finished and need some teeth. I also plan on making a few more that hang as ornaments.

I made the box pretty :)



New Decorator

In this one, I wanted to further distort the figure and make it less obvious. You have to really look to see any figure at all. I love the intricate details I got into while making this one and the way the color plays with the eyes. By the way, these are the worst pictures my old Kodak EasyShare C533 (which I received as a gift nearly 6 years ago) has ever taken. I promise to bequeath you with less awful images in the near future. 

Detail

Detail

Detail

Decorator V

Sunday, February 19, 2012

Draft 2 of Artist Statement

Same ideas presented, but it reads a little better. I believe I'm getting close to a satisfying conclusion with this one.

Chloe York

2-19-2012
Artist Statement: Draft 2



My current body of work explores my fascination with putting on makeup, skin and hair treatments, padded bras, and uncomfortable high heeled shoes to obtain an appearance that is deemed pleasing to a broad, general eye. I consider this practice a form of self-defense against those who would form opinions about me based on a narrow set of socially prescribed images of the ideal woman in television, magazines, and movies.

Compared to other species, humans display fears about personal appearance in ways that no other creature does, but I do see similarities in the desire of animals to camouflage and defend themselves from predators and to alter their appearance in order to attract a mate. One such creature is the decorator crab. When threatened, the decorator crab collects bits of its surroundings like vegetation, coral, and smaller organisms and covers its entire body, camouflaging itself. Inspired by this creature’s practice and my love/hate relationship with altering my own appearance, I paint stylized, androgynous human figures that are almost unrecognizable with all the oceanic patterns and forms covering their bodies.

To convey the idea of self-defense on the painting surface itself, I use complementary color palettes and strong detail work to play with the viewer’s eye and the use of flat acrylic paint handling on the surface allows the patterns and shapes to play against each other all the more. This flattened and depthless aesthetic discourages the desire to spend an extended amount of time looking at the piece, while the repetitive details within each simple shape aid in leading the viewer’s eye around the figure’s body and its environment. The surface is inviting, but also confusing and tumultuous, challenging the idea that decorating oneself is as advantageous as many of us have been led to believe.

Monster Costume

I've posted images of this before, but they were all during the filming process. Despite the unfortunate blurriness, this gives more of an idea of how the mask and claws looked while on.



Saturday, February 18, 2012

Finishing Phase 1 of Stop-Motion Group Project

Testing the lights

Minor head adjustments

Close-up growling shot

Slow-Mo monster battle

Ready for Spring

My apartment all decked out with flowers. I love a little color to combat the nasty gray day outside.

Yeah, that's Futurama playing back there


Valentine's Day flowers

Wednesday, February 15, 2012

Wedding Invite Rough Sketch

This is it. I really like where this is going so far, but the symmetry aspect is a toughie. But because this is just a rough sketch, I have plenty of options on where I want to take this. Editing this digitally is always an option; there are programs out there that have mirroring effects and things like that. Eric and I are considering making this a litho print so we can just make copies of them in the studio and go from there. We also want to use colored envelopes and make little stamps to decorate the outside.

Armature in Progress

It sure doesn't look like much right now, but just wait till the head, hands, and feet are added. Then a bunch of colorful oceanic forms. Like my decorator crab figures, but 3-D. It's all just too exciting!

Stage 1: Fabric on Torso and Arms

Stage 2: Fabric on Legs

Tuesday, February 14, 2012

3-D Animation Set

Our first project in 3-D Animation is to team up and create a film using methods involving pixellation, working on a flat wall, and a light box. Our first method is pixellation, which is basically moving objects or people around in a space to achieve an animation effect.
Gorgeous, no?

We decided to make our characters two monsters that fight over food. This is the set we constructed. It looks pretty bad now, but on film, it looks rather convincing. You can kind of see my monster mask sitting there to the side. I constructed it out of fabric and wire, along with some gloved hands with claws. 


Marty setting up the tripod.



I thought I had the easy job since I don't have to film any of this first part, but having to sit perfectly still and only moving your body only slightly every time the camera takes a shot was painful. My legs are still asleep. But we got about ten-fifteen seconds of footage, which isn't bad for a few hour's work. I can't wait to film some more tonight!

My group consists of some major talent. 


Monday, February 13, 2012

Postcards

If you are in the Memphis area, or would like to have a reason to be in the near future, please come to this show. Lots of good things are in store for you, my dear, if you come to this show.


Sunday, February 12, 2012

Decorator Crab Portrait

"Decorator IV" Acrylic on Panel 1 1/2' x 2'

Detail





Detail
Detail

Draft 1 of Artist Statement

This pretty much encompasses the work I'm doing right now and the direction I wish to keep going in. Since this is only my first draft, I will probably come in with many changes, but for now, I'm pretty happy with where this is going.

Chloe York
2-7-2012
Artist Statement: Draft 1

As a young woman constantly exposed to various images of the “ideal” woman in television, magazines, and movies, I constantly battle with my self-image, striving to obtain an appearance that is deemed pleasing to a broad, general eye. As a result, my current body of work explores my fascination with putting on makeup, skin and hair treatments, padded bras, and uncomfortable high heeled shoes in order to remove these doubts I have about my looks. I consider this practice to be a form of self-defense. 





Compared to other species, humans display fears about personal appearance in ways that no other creature does, but I do see similarities in the desire of animals to camouflage and defend themselves from predators and to alter their appearance in order to attract a mate. One such creature is the decorator crab. When threatened, the decorator crab collects bits of its surroundings like vegetation, coral, and smaller organisms and covers its entire body, camouflaging itself. Inspired by this creature’s practice and my love/hate relationship with altering my own appearance, I paint stylized, androgynous human figures that are almost unrecognizable with all the oceanic patterns and forms covering their bodies. 




To convey the idea of self-defense on the painting surface itself, I use complementary color palettes and strong detail work to play with the viewer’s eye and the use of flat acrylic paint handling on the surface allows the patterns and shapes to play against each other all the more. This aesthetic discourages the desire to spend a large amount of time looking at the piece, while the strong details aid in leading the viewer’s eye around the figure’s body and its environment. The surface is inviting, but also confusing and tumultuous, challenging the idea that decorating oneself is as advantageous as I have been led to believe. 


                                                                                                                                          -Chloe York

Tuesday, February 7, 2012

Brace Yourself for the New-ness!


In Progress


Matt Leines

This reminds me of the decorator crab portraits I'm doing. Leines's detail work is fantastic and his CV is intimidatingly long. Such an inspiration.

Matt Leines

Monday, February 6, 2012

Example of a 3-D Animation Piece

Brought to you by the talented Eric Quick, here is his rendition of "The Brave Tailor." I took a few of these camera shots myself, so I can tell you that while this film is rather short, he spent massive amounts of time on this thing. The needle and thread stuff was especially tricky. Also, no audio was added, but it's still pretty fun to look at. Enjoy.


Note: Incidentally, today is Mr. Quick's birthday. All the more reason to celebrate his talent for all things sculptural, yes?

3-D Animation Love

My armature came with its own tiny screwdriver!

This is the final semester of my undergrad year. So what better way to top it all off than with participating in one of the most time-consuming, tedious, and challenging forms of art-that of stop-motion or 3-D animation. Enrolling in this class has further proven my masochistic disregard toward maintaining a manageable schedule that allows me to sleep at night and be a normal, social being. I'm sure everyone is familiar with what filming something in this style entails, but I'm gonna tell you anyway.

First you have to come up with a story and character designs. In regular 2-D animation, the artists simply draw out their characters and backgrounds and use a computer system (pardon my ignorance for all things design art; we've not yet covered the animation software portion of the class) to make their characters move and interact within that space. That alone is tedious enough, but imagine having to build your characters and construct your sets and backdrops and then having to painstakingly move your character through the space little by little, all the while photographing the slight movements as you go. Oh and if you happen to move something too much or bump into one of your stage elements, you're screwed and that sequence of shots is over.

It takes hundreds of individual shoots with the camera to produce only a few minutes of the animation, so I imagine once we actually start creating our films, you won't be hearing from me anymore. But to tide you over, here is the armature that I was assigned and a preliminary sketch for what my character is going to look like. 

A decorator crab person! And it's going to move on its own! Well, on screen anyway...

Sunday, February 5, 2012

My Studio as of Two Days Ago

This is the current state of my studio. I didn't set it up for these photos. It really does stay that clean normally. I am a bit anal about keeping things neat, so unless I'm in work mode, I try to keep everything put away and looking nice. Most people need a little clutter to put them in the art-making mindset, but I detest a bunch of crazy mess all around me when I'm trying to do something.

Working on this baby right now. It's going to be another decorator crab portrait. You can kind of see it on the easel back there.

Thursday, February 2, 2012

I Can't Decide if I like this Painting...

I made this last semester, but am having a hard time making my mind up about it. In some ways, I think it is successful; I like the odd color palette and the way I incorporated drawing by scratching into the wet paint, but all in all, it just doesn't do it for me. It's as if I like half of it half as well as I should like and I like less than half of it half as well as it deserves... But I really want to hear some opinions. That's what those handy comment sections are for. Send some kind words my way. Or simply tell me if you like this painting. Or dislike it. Let's just bring on the communication!

I LOVE the Dixon!

Look at all this swag the Dixon is letting me borrow to make demos for my classes!


This is making me even more excited for March to hurry up and get here so I can start educating me some children! There's going to be a Floral Watercolor Landscape class, a Create-a-Character class with drawing and sculpting, some insect paintings, there's just no end to the marvelous activities I have in store for my lessons. Stay tuned for more details!

Need a Face Painter?


This is me. Painting on people. See how invested I am in my performance? I am one dandy painter of flowers, stars, initials, cute animals, and hearts on peoples' flesh. [That may be because I paint all the time anyway, but I digress.] 

 I got to work with these adorable ladies. Face (and arm, as indicated by this photo) painting is great. One of the highest art forms, in my humble opinion. 


When was the last time you acted as a human painting surface; that is, allowed someone to paint on you?  I'd suggest giving it a go in the near future. Face painters are excellent for birthday parties and other celebrations. Kids love it!  

Note: I forget the point in creating this post. I make a little extra money now and again cleaning houses and I may have inadvertently inhaled some bleach fumes earlier, so this post probably has no point at all other than an attempt at shameless self-promotion. Mostly I just lack images of me working and thought this was a pretty good example, although I wish I had captured a few photos of the paintings themselves while I was at it. 

Also, I plan on posting some photos of my newest creations and a look at my studio, so keep checking in. And if you read this and are thinking to yourself: Hmm, I could sure use a face painter for my next event, then by all means, send me a message! 

I apologize if this post was as boring as I feel it must be.